Concluding my log of quotes from Scratch: Writers, Money, and the Art of Making a LivingI EARLY DAYS and II THE DAILY GRIND–with final section of the book, III SOMEDAY.

It was Austin Kleon, in conversation with Manjula, who inspired the idea for this series. In “Selling Out” Austin also remarked: “What happens when the thing that kept you alive suddenly becomes the thing that literally keeps you alive? The thing that kept you spiritually alive now not only has to keep you spiritually alive, but also has to keep you financially alive? Like, literally, alive. Like, food in your mouth.”

 

“A Sort of Fairy Tale” Malinda Lo

“The fact is, financial necessity can be extremely clarifying. When your goal is to make enough money to pay the rent, writing loses a lot of its artistic mystique and becomes something much more mundane: a job. Thinking of writing as a job made the countless uncertainties that come with being a writer manageable. It gave me a rubric by which to measure my success. But without financial need, I found it difficult to continue thinking of writing as my job. And if I didn’t need to write for money, why was I writing?”

 

“FAQ: How to Buy a HomeMallory Ortberg

“But it is important to acknowledge the distinction between being broke and being poor.”

 

From “Diversity is Not Enough” by Daniel José Older (click to expand)

 

“Diversity is Not Enough: Race, Power, Publishing” Daniel José Older

The question industry professionals need to ask themselves is: How can I use my position to help create a literary world that is diverse, equitable, and doesn’t just represent the same segment of society it always has since its inception?”

 

“Worth” Jennifer Weiner

“Would I have taken the deal, knowing what it meant? In the business of being an author, is it better to be broke but respectable than it is to be rich but dismissed? And why does it even matter? I’ve been asked, more than once—usually by one of the writers on the broke-but-respectable side of things, unpublished or underpublished or underappreciated, well-reviewed but not well-read, one who can’t imagine that it’s anything other than heaven on the other side of the fence. You’ve got money. What could be wrong? Who cares what people are saying. Just laugh all the way to the bank!

I can’t answer them.”

 

“The If of It: Lunatic Independence in Nine Easy Steps” Laura Goode

Preliminary research revealed no studio would acquire or produce a screenplay about three diverse women trying to discover America and themselves through politics and sex.”

 

I deeply appreciated this book, found it invaluable. Much gratitude to Manjula Martin for creating this compendium that kept it real about money and art and publishing but also most notably enriched the conversation about class.

For sure, I’ll return to the thoughts of Colin Dickey, Kiese Laymon, Leslie Jamison, Malinda Lo, Daniel José Older, and Laura Goode, time and time again, like found treasure.

xx