Brooklyn Rail logo(2)My (fangirl) review of Leah Vincent’s memoir Cut Me Loose is included in the November issue of The Brooklyn Rail.

"...my goddamn flesh." Leah Vincent in Cut Me Loose

“…my goddamn flesh.” Leah Vincent in Cut Me Loose

 

From “My Goddamn Flesh”:

As the daughter of a respected rabbi, Leah Vincent was born into a world that worshiped messiahs, men, and modesty in suburban Pittsburg. A middle child in a family of 13 devoted to the Yeshivish faith, an ultra-orthodox sect of Judaism, Vincent writes, “I had been groomed to handle men—God, my father, my future husband—with relentless worship. I carried that lesson from my childhood…like a butterfly dragging its cocoon.”

Vincent’s coming-of-age memoir is a dark journey of hacking her way out of a stifling religious community—through questioning, cutting, and exploring her sexuality—in order to go frei, Hebrew for free. While Cut Me Loose is about a girl shedding her skin, it also provokes the question over whether anyone can truly escape the culture in which she was weaned.

Continue reading in The Brooklyn Rail